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Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

5 edition of Oral bacterial ecology found in the catalog.

Oral bacterial ecology

the molecular basis

  • 52 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by Horizon Scientific in Wymondham .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Mouth -- Microbiology,
  • Bacteria -- Ecology,
  • Molecular microbiology

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statementedited by Howard K. Kuramitsu and Richard P. Ellen.
    ContributionsKuramitsu, Howard K., Ellen, Richard P., 1946-
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQR47 .O665 2000
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvi, 314 p. :
    Number of Pages314
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6893656M
    ISBN 101898486220
    LC Control Number00690731

    Get this from a library! Oral bacterial ecology: the molecular basis. [Howard K Kuramitsu; Richard P Ellen;] -- "Aimed at researchers in the field of oral microbial pathogenesis this book reviews in depth the molecular basis of oral pathogenesis and ecology. Leading scientists from around the world have. This chapter focuses on microbial colonization of enamel and cementum, the exposed hard surfaces of the oral cavity. A study demonstrated that about 50% of the oral microbiota remains to be characterized, a small percentage relative to that in other natural environments (99% to %). Furthermore, previously undescribed phylotypes revealed in this study using molecular methods were to a large.

    Although great strides have been made in understanding the complex bacterial community inhabiting the human oral cavity, for a variety of (mainly technical) reasons the ecological contributions of oral fungi, viruses, phages, and the candidate phyla radiation (CPR) group of ultrasmall bacteria have remained understudied. Several recent reports have illustrated the diversity and importance of. Future therapies for the treatment of dental decay have to consider the importance of preserving bacterial ecology while reducing biofilm adherence to teeth. A multi‐species plaque‐derived (MSPD) biofilm model was used to assess how concentrations of N‐acetyl‐ l ‐cysteine (NAC) (0, 01, 1, 10%) affected the growth of complex oral.

    Oral bacteria are the first human microbiome to encounter the food we eat. To date, most research has focused on the role of oral bacteria in the development and progression of caries and periodontal disease; however, little is known about the microbial communities that maintain a healthy oral cavity. This book, Oral Microbial Communities: Genomic Inquiry and Interspecies Communication, helps.   Oral microbial community is one of the most complex bacterial florae associated with human body. Up to now, more than different bacterial species have been identified from human oral cavity. Oral bacteria form communities on distinctly different surfaces, such as hard enamel and cementum, as well as on soft epithelial cells. These communities are biofilms, which are characterized .


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Oral bacterial ecology Download PDF EPUB FB2

In this book, expert contributors from around the world provide an update on recent developments in the burgeoning field of oral microbial ecology. The chapters are arranged into five sections: microbial populations in oral biofilms, the structure of oral biofilms, communication and sensing within biofilms, health to disease, and new approaches.

Oral ecology refers to the organisms that live in a mouth. Bacteria in biofilm were first detected under the microscopes of Antony van Leeuwenhoek in the 17th century. Various bacteria and saliva are two of the major components in oral microbiology, having the capability to be harmful, but also performing beneficial and necessary roles in the immune system.

Oral Bacterial Ecology: The Molecular Basis. Publisher: Horizon Scientific Press Editors: Howard K. Kuramitsu State University of New York, Buffalo, USA and Richard P. Ellen University of Toronto, Canada Publication date: May ISBN (hbk) ISBN (hbk) Pages: vi + Aimed at researchers in the field of oral microbial pathogenesis this book reviews in.

SUMMARY In the oral cavity, indigenous bacteria are often associated with two major oral diseases, caries and periodontal diseases. These diseases seem to appear following an inbalance in the oral resident microbiota, leading to the emergence of potentially pathogenic bacteria.

To define the process involved in caries and periodontal diseases, it is necessary to understand the ecology of the Cited by:   Overlooked Contributors: Ultrasmall Bacteria, Fungi, and Phage Play a Significant Role in the Ecology of the Human Oral Microbiome.

Since the initial discovery of bacteria from the oral cavity by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek in the 18th century, the human oral microbiota has become the model system for studying multispecies microbial communities 2, 3, by: Part of the Advances in Microbial Ecology book series (AMIE, volume 3) Abstract.

The importance of the oral microorganisms to the process of dental caries was first recognized by Miller () at the end of the last century. Gibbons, R. J., and van Houte, J., a, Bacterial adherence in oral microbial ecology, Annu.

Rev. Microbiol. IVE TRACT BACTERIA. ial Ecology of the Human Oral Cavity. The teeth and oral epithelial surfaces are colonised by a great variety of bacte­ rial species. A partial list of indigenous (autochthonous) organisms found in the adult human mouth is shown in Table 11 (Gibbons.

and. van Houte, ; Gibbons. and. van Houte, The mouth is an important niche for bacterial colonization. Previous research used mouth microbiota to predict diseases like colon cancer and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is still unclear how the sampling methodology influences microbial characterization.

Our aim was to determine if the sampling methods, e.g., cotton swab or tissue biopsy, and the age influence the oral microbial. indigenous bacteria, defining the role of SIgA in the control of the oral indigenous microbiota is a prerequisite for the elabo-ration of effective vaccines against these diseases.

Until now, studies that evaluated the role of SIgA in the microbial ecology of the oral cavity gave contradictory results. In. DEVELOPMENT OF THE ORAL MICROBIOME. The womb of the fetus is usually sterile.[11,12,13] However, recent studies have reported intrauterine environment colonization, specifically the amniotic fluid, by oral microorganisms, in up to 70% of the pregnant women.[] The baby comes in contact with the microflora of the uterus and vagina of the mother during delivery, and later.

Oral cavity is a unique ecological niche, which is warm, moist and relatively opens to the outer environment. Tooth surfaces as well as dental plaque constantly encounter different challenges from food intake, speech, and so on. Bacteria grow in two different ways: planktonic and biofilm forms.

Microbial ecology in the oral cavity. oral microbial ecology. The focus of the book is on the most topical areas in oral microbiology and the volume is a detection and culture of novel oral bacteria, bacterial catabolism of salivary substrates, structural organization of oral biofilms, the extracellular polysaccharides matrix, extracellular.

Although great strides have been made in understanding the complex bacterial community inhabiting the human oral cavity, for a variety of (mainly technical) reasons the ecological contributions of oral fungi, viruses, phages, and the candidate phyla radiation (CPR) group of ultrasmall bacteria.

Organized into five parts encompassing 17 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the various types of oral and dental infections.

This text then describes the different environmental characteristics of the human mouth, which consists of a complex mixture of microbial species of bacteria, fungi, mycoplasma, and protozoa. Advances in Microbial Ecology by M. Alexander,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.

Advances in Microbial Ecology was established by the International Committee on Microbial Ecology (ICOME) to provide a vehicle for in-depth, critical, and even provocative reviews to emphasize recent trends in the important field of microbial ecology.

Introduction. Coaggregation has been defined as the adherence of genetically distinct bacteria, and is regarded as an important process in the development of multispecies biofilms (Kolenbrander, ), particularly in bacteria associated with dental plaque (Gibbons & Nygaard, ).Physical interactions between coaggregating bacteria facilitate metabolic interactions (Dragoet al., ), such.

the Ecology of the Human Oral Microbiome Since the initial discovery of bacteria from the oral cavity by Antonie van Leeuwenhoek in the 18th century [1], the human oral microbiota has become the model system for studying multispecies microbial communities.

Oral microbiology is the study of the microorganisms (microbiota) of the oral cavity and their interactions between oral microorganisms or with the host. The environment present in the human mouth is suited to the growth of characteristic microorganisms found there. It provides a source of water and nutrients, as well as a moderate temperature.

MECHANISMS OF ADHESION BY ORAL BACTERIA Catherine J. Whittaker, Christiane M. Klier, and, and Paul E. Kolenbrander Annual Review of Microbiology Oral Microbial Communities: Biofilms, Interactions, and Genetic Systems Paul E. Kolenbrander Annual Review of Microbiology MICROBIAL ECOLOGY OF THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT D.

Savage. The book is divided into three sections: saliva and oral diseases, molecular biosciences, and cell and tissues. The first section contains chapters that discuss proteomic analyses by mass spectrometry and NMR-based metabolomics that can be used to not only study saliva, but also to assess other oral fluids such as gingival crevicular fluid.Hardback: ISBN EAN Expert authors from around the world provide an update on recent developments in the burgeoning field of oral microbial ecology.

The focus of the book is on the most topical areas in oral microbiology and the volume is a major new work in the field.The aim of this comprehensively written volume is to provide a baseline of information on the normal microflora at various sites in the body.

It focuses on the mouth, upper digestive tract, large intestine, skin, and urinogenital tract. Written in an easy-to-read format, this book highlights the level of detail available.

For example, it explains that in the mouth and colon the data are.